Author Topic: Corfu History  (Read 6488 times)

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Offline daveyh

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #30 on: February 01, 2012, 03:21:19 PM »
Lias you are right about Sgt Wheeler. I too have heard of his book.

Trisha; agree about the covers. All reprint of old books by Bibliolife have the same or very similar boring covers. They dont attract if on a shelf but then I guess when you order one of their books you know what you are getting. You'll find all their current 885 titles here (sorry cannot do link so you'll need to copy and paste)

http://aphrohead.com/Search/Publisher/365552



Offline corfukate

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2012, 04:47:24 PM »
This is very interesting, to read of all these historic writings about Corfu.  I have a shelf on my bookcase, dedicated to books on Greece!

My interest/ love of Greece first peaked as a girl, reading' My Brother Michael'., followed by 'This Rough Magic'.iI have books on art, history; guide books, novels, read and reread often.

Has anyone else read "The Mask of Atreus? a really tantalizing story, partly set in Greece.

Lias? Lavinia? Is that you? Good to see you on here if so, and many other familiar names. Im really Corfukate, cant think where Ethelreda came from, that was my penname, as a child authour at school!

Offline nafsica

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2012, 07:54:40 PM »
The book mentioned, by a lady who worked at a field hospital in Corfu - there were a number of extracts published in the Corfiot some years ago. I will look it up. I seem to remember it was about the Maude Hospital - very interesting story.

Offline jan

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2012, 08:05:11 PM »
yes, it was in The Corfiot- must chase up the whole diary sometime.

I doubt if anyone staying at San Stefano Hotel knew that the area where the pool is situated is called Nosokomeion. or Hospital, because it was the site of the First World War field hospital.

The staff lived in our house, and my mother in law said that when they moved back the doctors' names were above their bedroom doors.  Then nurses were in the staff quarters opposite, presumably to avoid any unseemly behaviour.

I wonder if people realise that most land on Corfu has a name, reflecting its history.  We have Nosokomeion, Megali Skala (big staircase) and Papa Georgi (presumably land bought in the distant past from a priest of that name) and many others.  When my husband used to organise the groups of olive pickers he just told them which area they were to go to- everyone knew the old names.

San Stefano Estate (historical villa welcoming visitors) Benitses
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Offline Viviene

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2012, 09:04:48 PM »
Agree, the artist's book was fascinating and isn't there  also a journal kept by a British solider based on Corfu during the British rule of the island?   Is his name Sergeant Wheeler?   Also, Jan, did you tell me about a nurse who worked in the field hospital at San Stefano who also kept a journal?   The sight of snow in Corfu has slightly unnerved me - so maybe I am imagining things!!


Lavinia

On Amazon they have a Book called 'The Letters of Private Wheeler'  Edited and with a  Foreword by Captain B H Liddell Hart.

ISBN No. 0900075589


I looked inside the Book on line and it does talk of the letters he wrote in Corfu.

Viv



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Offline Dasia

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2012, 11:03:03 PM »
This is a fascinating thread; it's great to find out about these memoirs about Corfu and new (to me!) aspects of Corfu history, such as the WW1 military hospital Jan mentions.

Trisa or anyone else who has a copy, is the reprint of the book by Sophie Atkinson illustrated with her watercolours? Googling around I discovered this long-lived and well-travelled lady spent quite a few years in British Columbia, Canada.  Four of what I take to be her paintings are reproduced on the blog site of Jim Potts, who wrote Corfu Blues.

Nafsika I too encourage you to translate Mr. Klimis' memoir and write your own too (would love to hear about those early days of tourism and the coming of the Junta :() but do appreciate how daunting it must be to consider finding a publisher. Not that I know anything about how one goes about it, but these days some people are e-publishing. For example, in the Reading Room, Karen asks if anyone has read "Good Morning Corfu" by David Ross. It seems only to be available as an e-book. Maybe that's an easier way to get a book out there than the traditional route?
“Gradually the magic of the island settled over us as gently and clingingly as pollen.” G. Durrell

Offline Trisa

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2012, 11:10:24 PM »
Dasia,

Yes, the book does have illustrations of her watercolours.

I just love the way she describes her wonderful time in Corfu. I so wish I'd seen the island then.

Trisa
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Offline nafsica

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #37 on: February 02, 2012, 02:37:43 PM »
Trisa (and not only!) - apart from the paintings of Edward Lear which reveal an earlier Corfu than Sophie Atkinson's, you might like to look up John Singer Sargent. a great American painter who lived from 1856 tp 1925. During his lifetime he travelled widely and painted everywhere that he went. He stayed in Corfu in October 1909. I thought you might find the following interesting:

Sargent visited Venice with his frequent traveling companions - his sister Emily (1857-1936), a watercolorist, and the painters Jane (1873-1961) and Wilfred (1870-1951) de Glehn. In October the group decamped for Corfu, a fashionable resort patronized by the German and British aristocracy. There Sargent painted a number of views of the Villa Sotiriotisa, where he stayed, as well as the island's olive and orange groves and tempting slivers of the Ionian Sea glimpsed through a screen of cypresses. In these pictures Sargent carne as close as he ever did to an impressionist aesthetic, especially in the most sparkling of them, a view of a small stucco building in the park of the royal villa Monrepos, which reveals his fascination with the effects of direct and reflected light [ILLUSTRATION FOR PLATE IV OMITTED]. With nothing more complex than liquid strokes of pale blue on rough-textured white paper that evokes the coarse stucco, Sargent suggests the dancing shadows cast by overhanging trees and, by extension, the pleasures of a Mediterranean holiday in which the baking heat is relieved by balmy breezes and a glimpse of the sea just beyond.

The above was downloaded from the Internet by me when I was doing some research on Sargent.
His paintings of Corfu were exquisite - and he certainly captured the timeless nature of the Corfiot countryside, as well as the beauty of its gardens.
The Villa Sotiriotissa was, and I think still is, at the point where the main road from Corfu town turns into the Kontokali area. In those days the road was in a very different place - what you travel on now is comparatively recent.
Incidentally, this villa was one of those rented by the Durrell family in the nineteen-thirties - Gerald Durrell called it 'the Daffodil-Yelloe villa' in My Family and Other Animals.

Nafsica

Offline kumquat

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2012, 06:48:10 PM »
I have been on 3 long days at work :( and just had a lovely half hour  :D reading this post was upset when got to the last one. Keep thrm coming. 
Live Life Love Corfu!

Offline jan

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2012, 11:28:11 PM »
if in Moraitika go into the Co-op and there is a photograph on the wall of the Serbian camp there in the First World War. 
Go down the road towards Agios Mattheos and there is a Serbian war cemetery on the right, turn left as if going top the lake and at Gardiki castle turn right and you see a sign pointing to the well/fountain that the Serbians dug for a water supply.  Continue on towards  Paramona, passed Skidi and Prasoudi, and you pass a gun emplacement from World War One.

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Offline Steve

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2012, 02:42:47 AM »
Don't worry Kumquat there are lots of things to to come yet.

The members knowledge is huge, Jan, myself and a lot more will be adding to this post as much as we can.

Stevie,  8)
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Offline Viviene

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #41 on: July 23, 2012, 10:39:18 AM »
Good Morning Everyone

I need your Help please  :)


I have been asked to help a small Travel Company who deal with WWII Tours.  They have asked me for some ideas that we can contact schools, colleges and universities etc.

Now at the moment they do quite a few across main land Europe.

I have been thinking though if I can get enough information to be able to push forward an Idea about Greek Islands through WWII.  I know I can google quite a bit of information but I thought maybe some of you could help me with information.

For example I remember someone - I think it was Jan mentioned about an American plane that landed in the Salt Lakes down South and the locals hid the Americans from the Germans.  I also remember Lavinia saying about a Cafe/Taverna that is still there where some of our Navy Lads were having a Drink and the picture is still there on the Wall.

If you can put some ideas forward to me please - just thinking this could push tourism for the Islands and in between visiting any places they can also learn about Greek History going back further.  I am sure History Teachers would be very happy for the children to study this.

Thank you

Viv
Forgiveness is a funny thing. It warms the heart and cools the sting.

Offline Bob

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #42 on: July 24, 2012, 08:44:31 AM »
Viv,

This doesn't relate to the islands but the mainland. I think that Kalpaki on the mainland is possibly one of the most important places in WW11 / Greek modern history.

All that is there now is an army camp and a small museum run by the army. It is quite amateur by a lot of standards by very poignant. As you approach the area there is an enormous statue of a Greek soldier pointing across the landscape. If you let your eyes follow to where he is pointing, on the hillside opposite is the word 'OXI' commemorating Metaxa's famous reply when asked to allow Mussolini's troops into Greece.

The significance of Kalpaki was that it was the scene of the Allies first major victory against the Axis powers and arguably changed the course of WW11 because Hitler was forced to take troops from the Russian front to bolster Mussolini's ill advised excursion across Albania into Greece. The Greeks were very clever in that they formed their military divisions with men from local villages. They knew the terrain and were effectively fighting for their own villages. The Italian tanks became bogged down due to the weather and the Greeks slaughtered them. It was a turning point in WW11.

Kalpaki is easily accessible and the scenery is stunning. It is an easy run from Ioannina.

HTH

Bob
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Offline Viviene

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #43 on: July 24, 2012, 10:22:29 AM »
Thank you Bob.

Well that is one Idea I can pass to them.  I am just thinking of ways to boost Tourism to Greece and if I can move some ideas forward this way. Then I hope I have done my  little bit for Greece.

 8) 8)

I was also thinking about Crete did they not have quite a battle in 1941 along the coast at Rethymnon towards Chania.

Viv
Forgiveness is a funny thing. It warms the heart and cools the sting.

Offline Bob

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Re: Corfu History
« Reply #44 on: July 24, 2012, 10:44:26 AM »
Viv,

Crete was a serious battleground! If you want to gain favour in Crete tell them that you are a New Zealander! So many died trying to defend Crete. You also have the stories of that great British soldier, Patrick Leigh Fermor to draw upon. 'The Cretan Runner' which I believe he translated, gives a great insight into the resistance in Crete. The film 'Ill Met By Moonlight' was based upon the kidnapping of the German Commander in Crete by Fermor with his cohorts and subsequent shipping him of to Egypt.

Bob
Photographers are violent people. First they frame you, then they shoot you, then they hang you on the wall.
- Anon.

 

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