Author Topic: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two  (Read 7709 times)

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Offline CarlandShelley

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A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« on: February 14, 2012, 04:16:58 PM »
In part two of this guide we will share our experiences of importing our Nissan Xtrail into Corfu in January 2012, from our arrival to the allocation of Greek plates.  On sound advice we engaged the services of an import agent located opposite the Customs building at the port.  The cost of customs importing and his services was 350.00.  Please PM should you require his details.  We found him both pleasant to deal with and very efficient, although at times we felt like we were importing a tonne of cocaine as opposed to a car...

IMPORTANT NOTICE -

It is stated that an applicant to import a car without paying tax must be in possession of a residency permit.  We ensured that we had one before collecting the paperwork from the agent but it was not checked at this stage.  We still recommend having one as it was required at the traffic office (see stage three)

Stage One - Customs

1.  Assuming you will be using the services of the import agent you will require the following paperwork.

V5 logbook (original)
Certificate of permanently moving to Greece (the result of part one of this guide)
Certificate of conformity (we provided a photocopy - to keep original safe)
Proof of entry to Greece for the vehicle (we used the Ferry ticket from Venice to Igoumanitsa that had the car registration on it)
Details of place of residence on Corfu (contracts or house deeds etc) 

2.  At the agents he will require the above paperwork to send to Athens.  He will ask you to sign a document to state the value of the car - a bit confusing this but I think there is a threshold under which there is no tax to pay?  Not saying this is lawful but I think it was the case.  Our car was valued at 10,000.00 and we paid no tax at all.

3.  Before 12 o'clock noon You will be asked to attend the customs offices, part of the port (the arched buildings on the road from the port into town).  You will sit on a manky old vinyl chair whilst he finds and speaks to any number of officials.  Occasionally they will stop talking and look at you, just smile and stay seated.  This will go on for a while and then the agent will ask you to drive your car into the port to the rear of the customs building.  He will then appear with an official and may look at the vin/chassis plate number and engine or in our case may not!

4.  You will then return with the agent to his office where he will take a mobile number from you and say that the paperwork will be sent to Athens and will be back in 4 days.  Yes 4 days.

5.  4 days later.....He rang and we went and collected the paperwork, our receipts, the vehicle documents and the official authorisation for importing the car at ZERO tax.  We paid the agent 350.00 and were directed to the KTEO testing station near Aqualand.  Smiling in disbelief we left for Aqualand.

Stage two - The test centre

As you drive past Aqualand (with Aqualand on your left) you will see an official gated building, do not try to drive into it as it is some kind of military establishment (that's the brakes tested).  Instead follow the road that runs along the side of the water park, you will see a school on the right and then a single story building with no signs - that's the KTEO Test centre.

1.  Take all the documentation (from the agent) to the main desk along with 40.00.  A nice man will take your 40.00 and issue you with a voucher.  You hand this to a clerk at the main desk and stand and wait.  You will then be instructed to drive your car around to the testing bays.

2.  At the testing bay you will drive onto the rollers and wait,  if the man says "now it is the alpine road" you have got Spiros.  The car will go through a few checks on the rolling road for brakes etc and he will issue you with a blue KTEO technical inspection Certificate and a self adhesive disc that will eventually be stuck to the number plates.  Please put this somewhere safe unless you want to play hunt the disc each time you go to the traffic office...your next port of call.

Stage three - the Traffic Office

Drive back from Aqualand to the main road into Corfu town from the North.  On the right just before the traffic lights and the turning to the Port their is a FIAT car dealership.  On a slip road between the FIAT showroom and Star Bowling there is a building on the left about 300 yards down the slip road behind a small open car park, The Traffic Office. 

Before you enter ensure you have the following documentation, have completed the following steps and they are open.  The traffic office is open from 0900 - 1330 Monday to Thursday.  We recommend visiting any official office as close to 0900 as possible and certainly before 1100.

Documentation
V5 log book (original) - make sure you keep a photocopy for your records as the original will be kept at the traffic office.
All the documentation from the import agent
Photocopy of the blue KTEO test certificate and the original (the original will be returned to you)
Passport and photocopy
Residency permit and photocopy
Certificate of conformity (original) - make sure you keep a photocopy for your records as the original will be kept at the traffic office.
In addition you will need to provide a file to put above documentation in, suitable for a two-hole punch.

Not knowing the above we visited a stationers across the road from the traffic office to get the photocopying done, they also sell the files needed.  It is to the right of the petrol station when you look across the road.

Before you return to the traffic office you must go to EUROBANK.  the nearest branch to the traffic office is on the main road towrads the airport about 100 metres before KOTSOVOLOS (the electrical store).

In Eurobank you will need to pay the cashier 75.00 Euro and tell them it is for the registration of your car.  The Cashier will ask you for car details, your passport, a mobile number and your fathers first names.  they will then issue a yellow receipt that you must put with your paperwork ready for the traffic office.

Well done you are now ready to go to the traffic office.

As you enter walk to the desks in the right hand corner of the open plan area.  They will find you an English speaking clerk to help with the registration process.  They will take the file and check all paperwork returning the originals except the V5 and certificate of compliance.  You will sign a number of forms and tell you to return in two days to collect the plates...

Two days later we returned and yes the plates were ready!!!!  They issued a stamped printout of the new registration for the car, Corfu has run out of the Blue official log books and are only issuing to cars that will be travelling outside of Greece.  If we wish to drive out of Greece we must return to the traffic office to exchange the printout for the blue logbook.

I was given a set of red plates starting with PAO and we played hunt the disc for the last time, sticking it on the plate before it went missing again.

All we need to do now is visit the tax office in Corfu town to pay for the road tax.  This is another story yet to be experienced...

Although a long winded process, we found all those we dealt with to be helpful and each stage happened when they said it would.  If you have all the paperwork, in order then no problem.

I hope we have covered everything here.  The total cost for importing the car was as follows

Train to London 80.00 return
Certificate of permanently moving to Greece 12.60
Certificate of conformity (Car) 125.00
Customs agent 350.00
KTEO Test Certificate 40.00
Traffic Office plates & Registration 75.00
Residency Permit 0.50

At the end of the day a lot cheaper than paying import tax or purchasing an equivalent car here in Corfu - and what fun!!!!

Good Luck




Offline daveyh

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2012, 05:16:34 PM »
Two excellent posts. Imagine trying to do everything you have listed without any prior knowledge of the exact steps to take; you would end up going crazy. This information will be invaluable to anybody who is planning to import a car from the UK. 

Offline Denis O

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2012, 05:57:15 PM »
Absolutely superb info and thanks for that.

But.....can you imagine the state of mind of the person/quango that thought up that process in the first place. That makes UK bureaucracy seem almost efficient in comparison.

They must have a supply of some pretty heavy duty drugs in Athens  ;D

Offline Trisa

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2012, 06:35:35 PM »
There is absolutely no viable excuse now not to do it!!!!

Thank you so much for this information Carl and Shelley.

Trisa
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Offline SusieH

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2012, 09:18:35 PM »
Just one question. What is a certificate of conformity when it is at home? If we brought any vehicle with us it would probably be my 1972 Citroen Dyane because it is very practical, extremely reliable. has no gismos or computer chips and having owned it for 30 years I reckon we could keep it going for at leat another 20!!

But, it is classified as a classic vehicle in the UK. Would this mean it qualified for a certificate of conformity?

Offline jan

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2012, 09:23:09 PM »
Google   Certificate of Conformity and you can learn all about it.

It is the certificate that shows that you car conforms to EU specifications

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Offline Davie J

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 10:28:16 PM »
Very usefull information Carl and Shelley, hope your road tax is not to expensive.
Some friends of ours have a Greek Nissan Xtrail, which is 2ltr or 2000cc and there road tax is around 640 euros.

Davie

Offline Bob

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2012, 10:59:13 PM »
Davie, Your friends tax bill sounds about right if I recall. There is a table here in Greek which translates reasonably well with google translate  http://goo.gl/3Rd0m.

Bob
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Offline SusieH

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2012, 11:35:53 PM »
Google   Certificate of Conformity and you can learn all about it.

It is the certificate that shows that you car conforms to EU specifications

Thanks Jan but they only came in in the 90's, how do I get one for a car manufactured in 1972 and discontinued in the late 70's early 80's

I could not even get it serviced in a Citroen main agents, they no longer have any information on them - I know, I tried once

Offline Bob

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2012, 09:40:17 AM »
As a tip, I used an import agent to bring my car into Corfu. I have a feeling that CarlandShelley may have too. They dealt with everything. (Mr Doukakis - opposite the customs building) There was an issue about our car as it was fifteen or sixteen years old at the time (2002) - First registered in the UK in 1986 if memory serves me correctly.

The car was a Mitsubishi and apparently had never been offered for sale in Greece, It caused a lot of head scratching but between Mr Doukakis and the Customs officials, all was resolved!

I was recommended to use an import agent by a friend who had gone before me. It was good advice.

Bob
Photographers are violent people. First they frame you, then they shoot you, then they hang you on the wall.
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Offline SusieH

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2012, 05:20:53 PM »
Thanks Bob :)

Offline CarlandShelley

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2012, 08:00:07 AM »
Yes Bob as it says at the beginning of Carl's post we did indeed have the pleasure of dealing with the import agent, Mr Lavranos, who was very helpful, if a little stern at first we did eventually melt him and he managed a few smiles, especially after talking with our teenage son on the phone to try and get our mobile number, as we were a little late in meeting him !!!!  We were on our way to Corfu Town to see him but were held up and the only number he had for us was my sons Greek number, so the translation of the numbers for my phone via my son was apparently very amusing. He tried a couple of times, even phoning my son back to check and when he finally got through to us we were only 5 mins away from him, when we walked through his office door he was still smiling over the fact that when my son said no Mr Lavranos thought he was saying ne which of course is yes and so the confusion went on for some time apparently, I just wish that call could have been recorded !! I think it brightened his day anyway.
The Import Agent office no. is - 2661039710
Bob not sure if we can post his mobile number here ? but if anyone wants it we can be pm'd.

Offline meggy

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2012, 04:30:41 PM »
legislation that the EU is trying to bring in re car registration
http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP%2F12%2F349&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en
sorry hope link works still learning  ;D embaressed grin more like

Offline ShirlMark

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2015, 03:49:40 PM »
Hi,  Just about to experience the joy of importing our car and wondered if anyone had any updates?

Regards

Mark & Shirley

Offline Bob

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Re: A guide to importing your car to Corfu - Part Two
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2015, 06:16:28 PM »
Hi,

I think that the advice is still current. If it isn't perhaps you would be good enough to let us no otherwise for the benefit of those that follow in your footsteps.

Good luck!

Bob.
Photographers are violent people. First they frame you, then they shoot you, then they hang you on the wall.
- Anon.

 

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